Periodontitis Sensor




Video too slow or too fast?

If you click on the YouTube icon in the right bottom corner of the video ("Watch on YouTube") you will end up on YouTube and will be able to make the video faster or even more slowly.

Periodontitis Sensor

Chapter 54
Dental health and genetics

Training video

Spoken text of the video

Section 1: Intro

Chapter 54. Dental health and genetics. This is a specific training for the Periodontitis Sensor. This test is found here in the overview. It has two different roles. For one, it helps in prevention. When you do the test, you get a specific prevention health advice. It does not help with early diagnosis. So, there is no need to do a genetic test for this, but it also helps with improved treatment.


Section 2: The concept

Let me first explain the concept of periodontitis. This is a cross-section of a tooth. There is a bone holding the tooth and that is the gums. In our gums, there is a constant fight between bacteria and the immune system. So, bacteria invade the tissue and the immune system fights them back. This is usually a constant battle. However, it is not a very aggressive attack and response. There are a number of genes, the TNF-alpha, IL-1RN and Interleukin 6 genes, which modulate the aggressiveness of the immune system. When they are working correctly, the immune system does not respond too strongly and everything is fine. However, in Periodontitis, it is again the immune system that is causing the problems. So, genetic variations in these genes make the immune system too aggressive. While bacteria’s invasion into the tissue is moderate, the immune system starts to counter attack much aggressively. This causes inflammation of the gums of this area. If this persists for a long time, it starts to degrade the bone. So, it starts to reduce the bone tissue until the tooth can fall out. So, Periodontitis is damaged by the immune system. It makes the teeth come loose and they eventually fall out.

This is a screen shot of one of the reports. In case you have not seen this before and you do not know what it means, I would really recommend that you watch the training of the simple disease risk statistics which will explain it all to you. This here is the IL-1RN, the interleukin 1 receptor gene. This is what it does. 6 % have the C/C genotype with no increased risk and 47 % have 3.4 fold risk of Periodontitis. These here are the scientific studies behind it. This is the next gene. 32 % have an increased risk, with an odds ratio 1.89. Again, if you do not know what an odds ratio is, the training of the simple disease risk statistics will explain it to you. For the IL1A gene, 10 % would have a 1.73 increased risk and 5 fold risk. This is just for titanium implant loss, which is another training. So, I skip over this. Alright.

This is all very scientific and statistical stuff. I usually would not talk to patients about this much detail of the science behind it. I would say this is for experts who want to find out about it. It is shown in here in a simplified manner. So, this is how the risk of Periodontitis is in the report. The risk might be normal or very increased. For this person, it is sort in the middle area. They see on a scale of how high the risk is and how important the preventive measures we would recommend to them are for them. If it is in the normal range, it is less important. If it is in the increased range, it means they are at a much higher risk of experiencing tooth loss due to Periodontitis. This means they should follow prevention more thoroughly.


Section 3: Prevention

Prevention is very easy to understand. I would recommend if you ever get a report into your hand to read through it and you will see it is very simple to understand. I am just summarizing it. One is to pay a particular attention to oral hygiene; thoroughly brush your teeth with good toothpaste and good tooth brushes, go to dentist checkups every 3 to 6 months, so we would recommend it more often than we would recommend it for people with low risk. Then, there is professional oral hygiene. A professional would use certain tools to clean a plaque of teeth. This should be done more often if you have a higher risk. Then, there are other risk factors that play a role. For example, smoking increases the onset and the aggressiveness of the immune system. Dental caries or poor oral hygiene, as I said, is a risk factor. Mouth breathing or teeth grinding is a problem that should be put under control. Piercings in the mouth, metal objects that can constantly hit against the teeth, are also to be avoided if you have a higher risk.

This is the end of chapter 54, dental health and genetics, as a training for the Periodontitis Sensor. There is another aspect of dental health, titanium implant loss, which is influenced by genetics. This is a separate training that I would also recommend to watch concerning this topic.


PowerPoint slide for download






Periodontitis Sensor

Chapter 55
Titanium implant failure and genetics

Training video

Spoken text of the video

Section 1: Intro

Chapter 55, Titanium implant loss and genetics. This is a specific training for the Periodontitis Sensor. This is actually the second part. There is another training for the Periodontitis part. This part just focuses on Titanium implant loss. So, we recommend that you too watch the other training as well in case you have not done so already. Alright, once you have lost a tooth through periodontitis or through some other reason, a common solution is a titanium implant. That looks like this. It is basically a metal screw made out of titanium and it is crewed into the bone. It is an artificial tooth attached to the top. So, it looks like a normal healthy tooth.


Section 2: The concept

This is actually a quite difficult procedure. It takes ages for the bone to heal before you can attach the tooth. It can also be quite painful. However, once it is done correctly, it is usually a very good way of replacing lost teeth. There are genetic variations similar to periodontitis, which modulate the aggressiveness of the immune system again. In some cases, these can attack titanium. It is actually small titanium shadings that end up in the tissue, but the immune system starts to attack them and starts to do the same as in periodontitis. It degrades the bone and eventually, usually within a quite short time, you start to lose your titanium implant. This is a very expensive and a very painful procedure that you would want to avoid this at all cost if that is possible.

We now have a number of genetic variations that we know they contribute to the likelihood of titanium implant loss. There are five genes which play a role in this. All five genes might be the optimal type, there is no increased risk, or all five genes might be the increased risk type. This is what we have. If all of the genes are of the optimal type, you have approximately 3 % risk of losing your titanium implant. If one of the genes is of the risk type, it is 25 % risk. If there are two, it is 26 % risk. This goes up to five. So, if all five genes are of the sub-optimal type, you end up with 60 % risk of losing your titanium implant.

It is more likely than not that you lose your implant. In these cases, there are a number of other things, like ceramics or some polymer or some kind of plastics, that you can use as an alternative metal. What we recommend is you do the periodontitis test. You find out that your risk might be 3 %, then you can go ahead with titanium, or you might find out that it is 60 % likelihood, then you should go with a more expensive yet better material for your body’s immune system. So, titanium implant might not be suitable due to genetic predispositions and you might have a 50 % probability of losing it. Then, you should use an alternative such as ceramic, plastic or coated titanium that will help. Again, it is explained in a very simple language in the report. When you have the report you should read through it once and you will know what kind of things that we would recommend.

This is the end of chapter 55, Titanium implant loss and genetics as a specific training for the Periodontitis Sensor.


PowerPoint slide for download